1. docker

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I use docker, docker-machine, and virtualbox, the former two built and packaged from ArchMac. Too bad docker-machine-driver-xhyve is not seeing more love. Docker for Mac is a mess, it regularly pegs CPUs for no obvious reason at all on idling containers among other things. Plus now it packages k8s which made it balloon in size.
by lloeki 2019-10-19 09:14:04 | link | parent | submission

I have been running Cloud Shell on the google cloud console app on iOS. Only your home folder persists but you can set up a custom cloud shell environment with docker to add your favorite tools. Its pretty good for coding on the go (with vim) but for multiple terminals you might be better off using screen or tmux. I can even deploy on the command line because of gcloud and gsutil cli toolchains.
by faizshah 2019-10-19 08:18:44 | link | parent | submission

Docker in 10 Minutes (smalldata.tech)
by wheresvic3 2019-10-19 07:40:25 | comments

Easiest? Probably heroku after you get past the initial boilerplate - but can quickly become expensive. Most cost efficient would be to Spin up a cheap droplet in digital ocean, install docker-compose with a Postgres service and python image. In the python image, just boot up a Django server on port 80. If you need https, youll need to add something in front of Django, like nginx to handle ssl termination. App engine could also be a very quick and cheap way - you get ssl, and domain for free, but you do need to buy into their way of doing things, which has a bit of a learning curve .
by wilson_4 2019-10-18 20:16:37 | link | parent | submission

Bazel, the tool, is fantastic. Haven't had a better build tool that I've seen yet. The build rules are awful. Almost every single rule is broken in some catastrophic way and, as is typical with Google open source, it is very difficult to ask for things to either be fixed or designed differently. Major examples: rules_python flat out does not work for python 3, rules_docker does not work without python 2, rules_proto cannot generate stubs for languages, you cannot specify third party deps at a package level and there is no explanation as to why (they will say it would destroy hermetic builds or reproducable builds but that doesn't make sense when you think about ways to support both).
by gravypod 2019-10-18 19:11:21 | link | parent | submission

2. Kubernetes

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Kubernetes deployment strategies (2017) (blog.container-solutions.com)
by rumanator 2019-10-19 09:03:31 | comments

Very happy to share - my co-founder and I started a company called Simiotics, where we offer metadata stores for data, preprocessing functions/transforms, machine learning models, and statistics. We also have tools that integrate with these metadata stores to automate work that most data science teams perform manually today - running preprocessing jobs, updating models in production, monitoring the distribution of data and predictions in production models, things like that. Our pitch is that, instead of having to do complicated things like set up an Airflow cluster, spin up a Kubernetes cluster and build helm charts, manage Spark, etc., a data scientist can just call out to our APIs from their Python programs (which may be running in notebooks), and we take care of the stuff they need to do but don't want to do. This is our website: http://simiotics.com These are our docs: http://docs.simiotics.com (They are in a very sorry state, and it embarrasses us to post them here, but we are going to use that embarrassment to push us to make them better!)
by zomglings 2019-10-18 21:23:42 | link | parent | submission

Show HN: Simple K8s controller for email/Slack notifications for Velero backups

Hi! Since Velero doesn't have notifications built in yet, I wrote a stupid simple Kubernetes controller in Ruby (!) that implements email and Slack notifications for when a backup or restore is started, and when it's completed. It's very simple but it solves a need I had and other may have too :) https://github.com/vitobotta/velero-backup-notification
by SkyLinx 2019-10-18 19:45:12 | comments

3. aws

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You mentioned somewhere that you are using user-dedicated AWS VMs, but I don't see any mention of what size of instance you are getting? Does it vary depending on the Intermediate/Unlimited plan?
by GordonS 2019-10-19 10:22:28 | link | parent | submission

Microsoft very recently GA'd their Windows Virtual Desktop offering too: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-gb/services/virtual-desktop/ I imagine it will be tough to compete with AWS and Microsoft - I wonder if there is a niche you can specialise in?
by GordonS 2019-10-19 10:01:25 | link | parent | submission

How is this different than https://aws.amazon.com/workspaces/
by phonon 2019-10-19 00:47:18 | link | parent | submission

Citrix wasn't the only virtual desktop solution, and there are even more now; Azure and AWS each have them in their portfolio of cloud services, for instance.
by dragonwriter 2019-10-19 00:24:16 | link | parent | submission

4. coreos

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How to Run Background Processes via SSH on CoreOS (www.aegisblade.com)
by bthornbury 2019-10-18 00:42:50 | comments

Intel NUC7i5BNK with coreos running the following in a single node docker swarm: - Traefik (reverse proxy) - Git Annex - Gitea - Drone (CI) - Docker Registry - Clair (security scanning for docker images) - Selfoss (RSS reader) - Grafana / Prometheus / Alertmanager (overkill really) - A few custom applications... Turris Omnia running transmission under lxc
by preid24 2019-10-13 10:31:29 | link | parent | submission

You could also just fetch and configure the Vault operator ( https://github.com/coreos/vault-operator ) and be done with it.
by mindcrash 2019-10-04 20:38:30 | link | parent | submission

If you look at the diffs between this and the last list, there are def some companies that opted out of listing. Some of them had so much funding that there's no way that they could've just fallen out. For example, Machine Zone, Zenefits, LendUp, Soylent. Also interesting, are supposedly well-capitalized companies from the 2018 list that shut down: uBiome(with a fair amount of attention) and Meta. Other fun observations might just be how much money people are raising. Memsql was 40 in 2018, and is 67 in 2019. I'm guessing they didn't raise money in the time between, and a bunch of companies did so in the meanwhile. Also kind of interesting? CoreOS(2018 #42) was above Heroku (2018 #46), but in this year's list is above them (Heroku #71, CoreOS #73). But both were acquired by the time that the 2018 list was made. I'm not sure what this is about, but maybe it's because the acquisition terms weren't all cash, and there were fluctuations in the intervening time in Salesforce vs RHT(and then, RHT got acquired by IBM so who knows how that factors into the present value of what used to be CoreOS). Fun.
by daveed 2019-10-03 00:56:19 | link | parent | submission

One thing which I would need to switch from CoreOS to Talos is GPU drivers. My current setup uses the NVIDIA driver containers: https://hub.docker.com/r/nvidia/driver I build slightly customized images using a process derived from the one in the NVIDIA repo: https://gitlab.com/nvidia/container-images/driver/blob/maste... https://gitlab.com/nvidia/container-images/driver/blob/maste... The automation here is predicated on CoreOS distributing matching { kernel, headers, toolchain } artifacts for each release, and in particular how specific OS releases get promoted from the alpha -> beta -> stable channels without modification. This lets me build new drivers automatically for each alpha release, validate the drivers on the beta channel, and have no surprises on the stable channel. Does Talos intend to do something similar?
by willglynn 2019-09-25 03:19:05 | link | parent | submission

5. machine learning

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Like, personally, I regard statistics and machine learning as the same subject from different perspectives (mathematics vs computer science). Their differences are primarily driven by the context of the time of their development. Back when we had very little data, we needed strong assumptions to make inferences. As compute increased, this became less necessary and we could just bootstrap instead of needing normal theory confidence intervals. But apparently, this is a controversial view.
by disgruntledphd2 2019-10-19 09:14:55 | link | parent | submission

Machine Learning with Spreadsheets (medium.com)
by jacquesm 2019-10-19 00:51:14 | comments

I disagree. Machine learning education almost always involves a lot of focus on design of experiments, causal inference, A/B testing and related topics. I could agree with your claim if you meant bootcamp programs or data science sorts of coursework, but machine learning is generally grounded in both measure theoretic probability theory and a robust understanding of applied statistics before moving on. After that will be the basics of pattern classification, clustering, regression and dimensionality reduction. Last of all will be very domain-specific tools for NLP, computer vision, audio processing involving e.g. deep neural networks.
by mlthoughts2018 2019-10-18 21:36:43 | link | parent | submission

IMO, the important part is Section 3.3 of the [paper]( https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S174680941... ), particularly the image at [ https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S17468094193017... . To my eye the difference in shape of the orange and green signals could also be found through more traditional signal processing/statistical means that machine learning. In a past job I did a combination of manual and machine-learning-based analysis of cardiac signals. We didn't have ECG, but did have PPG (blood flow) and PCG (sound) signals, and a pretty large study group. I recall there being one study participant who's signals were very clearly indicative of heart failure, enough that we raised the issue with our medical advisor about whether the subject should be deanonymized and contacted. In the paper they state that "the CHF subjects used in this study suffer from severe CHF only"; my suspicion is that a simpler, "hand rolled" model based on the features of the ECG could compete very well with this CNN approach for finding the same level of pathology in the ECG signal, without the "black box" of a CNN casting doubt on the technique.
by ryanschneider 2019-10-18 21:25:25 | link | parent | submission

Very happy to share - my co-founder and I started a company called Simiotics, where we offer metadata stores for data, preprocessing functions/transforms, machine learning models, and statistics. We also have tools that integrate with these metadata stores to automate work that most data science teams perform manually today - running preprocessing jobs, updating models in production, monitoring the distribution of data and predictions in production models, things like that. Our pitch is that, instead of having to do complicated things like set up an Airflow cluster, spin up a Kubernetes cluster and build helm charts, manage Spark, etc., a data scientist can just call out to our APIs from their Python programs (which may be running in notebooks), and we take care of the stuff they need to do but don't want to do. This is our website: http://simiotics.com These are our docs: http://docs.simiotics.com (They are in a very sorry state, and it embarrasses us to post them here, but we are going to use that embarrassment to push us to make them better!)
by zomglings 2019-10-18 21:23:42 | link | parent | submission

6. javascript

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Once you get there I recommend then learning Typescript (Javascript with types) and compare the experience with Javascript.
by mbrodersen 2019-10-19 10:23:53 | link | parent | submission

Was this written in response to my post? Did it seem like I think my experience has been ruined in some way? Yes, and yes, it reads as "I was engaged until Internet Point Chasing Dweebs came along and took my fun away. Cool - sarcastically said, not cool at all, I'm smarting and resent the change. I guess I was a fool to think it would last and rationalise that it was a plan I should have seen and then chastise myself for not seeing it; I will pick myself up and get over it while pretending I'm not bothered at all, and leave those idiots to their stupid trivial JavaScript". I can't find anyplace on the website where you could talk to another person in a way that could conceivable use a personal pronoun Monica Cellio particularly is involved in Workplace.stackexchange a site where people post interpersonal questions about their workplace, and there are many comments and replies on posts and answers which have references such as " In Alice's reply, she focuses on the legal side, but I'd like to draw attention to power dynamic between blah blah ", or "I'm not sure this applies, OP said she is in Canada which has different expectations about blah blah", and often with regular posters discussing the question in amongst comments and their replies. There's also actual discussion forums (Slack-style web chatrooms) e.g. https://chat.stackoverflow.com/ which is where long comment chains get moderator-moved to for more realtime he-said/she-said discussions. I believe many chatrooms per stackexchange sub-site. Plus moderator private chat / moderator to company chat. As I said, my best guess is that there's a meta discussion forum someplace that moderators can use. There is a meta site for every StackExchange site, yes. e.g. https://meta.superuser.com/ for SuperUser, and then there's meta.stackexchange.com for an overall meta-meta site.
by jodrellblank 2019-10-19 08:28:47 | link | parent | submission

It’s A*. I wrote one encapsulated as an ES6 JavaScript Class a while back. Just dropping it here if anyone finds it useful. https://github.com/ronilan/a-mazing-thing Use as you wish.
by ronilan 2019-10-18 22:16:34 | link | parent | submission

I'm really curious about how the creators of the Wayback machine are working to save modern (perhaps sometimes somewhat unnecessarily overcomplicated) web pages that are using SPA technologies.
by tpmx 2019-10-18 21:25:25 | link | parent | submission

Looks like it's just hand written javascript and webgl https://ciechanow.ski/js/earth_sun.js
by d6e 2019-10-18 21:20:42 | link | parent | submission

7. python

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Show HN: Web Based Multipler Roguelike

Demo http://rogue.quuux.org/ Source https://github.com/mdellavo/rogue/ It's react/js/canvas frontend with python/asyncio/websocket backend.
by mdellavo 2019-10-19 12:08:28 | comments

It's interesting to watch the wonderfully meandering train of thought(s) triggered by a success report of using a non-mainstream programming language. So let's meander some more... The strong reactions are understandable. New programming languages are added to the zoo faster than ever before. And within each language there's a steady influx of new frameworks (angular1, angular2, react, vue, ...) each with a learning curve. It's a challenging environment, and it feels like it's getting exponentially harder as time progresses. One must resist the trap of following every silly new idea. So why bother spending even an afternoon with Haskell? Spend an afternoon playing with Python and you'll be writing code the next morning. Spend a day with Haskell and you'll have more questions than answers. The fundamental problem is, most likely, the new paradigm. Functional programming takes some time getting used to. Sure, the functional style is creeping into mainstream languages, so most of us have seen and used it already. But pure functional programming is another level. Broadly speaking, everything is a function, a function in the mathematical sense: Same input, same output. Everything is immutable, it's all about chaining pure functions. Crazy, right? Why would you subject yourself to such rigour? I'll argue that pure functional programming has something to offer that is more relevant than ever. 1. Pure functions are easy to test. Same input, same output, that is a strong guarantee. It'll still be a challenge to thoroughly test every single function, but at least each test is meaningful because there are no interactions with anything outside the function. 2. Pure functions are easy to compose and parallelize. Single-thread performance is hardly ever a relevant benchmark anymore. Sure, C is faster, but good luck trying to parallelize a complex C program. (The worst thing I can imagine is having to debug messed-up, multi-threaded C++ code.) 3. There is structure in how to compose pure functions, and it's structure in the mathematical sense, not in the fuzzy Gang of Four pattern sense. Much of the 'arcane', 'academic' jibber jabber is exactly about these mathematical structures. The power of having a rigorous method for structuring programs is immense. It really is. The hurdle is not a high as it may seem (unless you have a low affinity to maths - im which case you probably shouldn't be programming computers anyway). 4. Pure functions are easy to refactor. (See below.) I'll also argue that strong typing has a lot to offer and will become more mainstream. 1. Make the compiler your friend, not your enemy. Strong types glue the functions together in just the right way and prevent me from making silly mistakes. 2. Business logic can be encoded in a compact and transparent way. Changes to the business logic (and it always does change, doesn't it?) are also compact and transparent. 3. Refactoring is just ... wonderful. Strong types combined with pure functions, that is a magical combination. Change the type and let the compiler tell you what the implacations are. As there are no side effects code can be refactored with confidence. It is a vastly different experience from any OO language. Now, finally, to Haskell: It can be characterized as a strongly typed, lazy-evaluated, garbage-collected, pure functional programming language. (Lazy evaluation hasn't been mentioned, yet. It's something that needs to be understood and considered in order to write efficient code.) In "language design space", something like Haskell must exist and will always exist. (I say 'always' because maths has something eternal about it and pure functional programming and strong typing have solid mathematical underpinnings.) And in this "language design space" Haskell dominates. Contrast this with the compiled, weakly typed, imperative, low-level languages like C, C++, Golang, Rust. I have a hard time picking amongst those, but I believe everyone should know at least one of them. So is it worth learning Haskell? I tried to argue that it's not a fad and the concepts are fundamental and increasingly important. To me, personally, it looks like a an investment I can benefit from for decades to come. As a business, do the advantages outweigh the costs and risks? We all know that corporate culture often stands in the way of change. One root cause is the asymmetric payoff: A thank you if it goes well, and job-loss if it goes badly. In such an environment inertia is the rational choice. - But if your company truly believes to be an innovator, or leader in the field, or seeks to gain an edge over the competition, then Haskell should be on the list of things to try.
by mcmayer 2019-10-19 07:39:02 | link | parent | submission

Well I agree with you that that kind of recurrence (which mathematicians love to use so much, as do some functional programmers who're overly influenced by math) is not very intuitive and frankly is a programming anti-pattern in my view. But I disagree with you that recursion is the essence of fp. For your concrete example, a more functional version of doing that (in Python) would be something like: print("\n".join(a[i:] for i in range(len(a))) No need to reuse f(i-1) when you can express f(i) directly. Reusing the previous step (whether it is using recursion, rising intermediate computations in the form of local variables in a loop, or through a fold) should only be done when absolutely necessary.
by ummonk 2019-10-19 04:17:08 | link | parent | submission

8. ios

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I don't think hackability is so much the point as open ecosystem, privacy, and interoperability. iOS wiped the floor with Symbian, and Android wiped the floor with iOS due to being more open than the predecessor. Linux is the most popular OS kernel in the world (think routers, smart devices, etc.) I want a choice of thermostat which fits my decor, and for that to work with my smart thermometer. I'd like to buy both on eBay from a Chinese company if I'm poor, or at an upscale designer store if I'm rich.
by woofie11 2019-10-19 11:23:53 | link | parent | submission

> Objects from DataProviders are returned as immutable models. On iOS, where the app uses a CoreData cache, this means the rest of the app no longer needs to access mutable CoreData objects directly, which reduces the need to worry about concurrency issues and avoids the crashes due to accessing data on the wrong thread that are common with CoreData. Is this the common way of dealing with core data? I am actually doing exactly that at work right now, and was wondering if it was the right decision.
by augusto2112 2019-10-19 10:33:04 | link | parent | submission

I used a MacInCloud server as a build server for iOS apps for something like 3 years, and it was a good experience. The server was performant and totally stable, and the one time I contacted support about a billing issue, it was resolved quickly and professionally. Recommended. Only reason I don't use it anymore is that Azure DevOps now offers MacOS build agents.
by GordonS 2019-10-19 10:11:22 | link | parent | submission

We code once and ship to both iOS and Android devices (www.genuineimpact.io)
by asherwood 2019-10-19 09:53:18 | comments

I have been running Cloud Shell on the google cloud console app on iOS. Only your home folder persists but you can set up a custom cloud shell environment with docker to add your favorite tools. Its pretty good for coding on the go (with vim) but for multiple terminals you might be better off using screen or tmux. I can even deploy on the command line because of gcloud and gsutil cli toolchains.
by faizshah 2019-10-19 08:18:44 | link | parent | submission

9. ruby

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Well, I think a book to motivate you and get you out there, making something the quickest, is RE:WORK. It was written by the Ruby on Rails creator and his co founder at Basecamp. It’s pretty different than most books and most ideas are 1-2 pages long and I found that it got me motivated to build faster than any other book.
by elamje 2019-04-20 17:05:49 | link | parent | submission

> everything compiles to the same assembler code so lets not pretend these languages are doing magical things. They don‘t and many of the dynamic features of Python (and Ruby) cannot be efficiently compiled. That‘s why it relies heavily on C modules.
by quonn 2019-04-20 16:01:12 | link | parent | submission

>It's also why you don't get multi-line lambdas. Everything is a compromise. Arguably too much of a compromise. This is just Guido doing a "because I say so" and imposing his bias against functional programming. Give me a properly-designed language like Ruby any day over Python's bag of compromises.
by cutler 2019-04-20 15:30:56 | link | parent | submission

Some of the simple words and their prominence can be amusingly informative, though. Take data structures for example. "string", "array", and "object" are about as equally prominent in both JavaScript and Ruby (where the dictionary is called "hash"). In Python, however, "string" and "list" far outweigh "dictionary" and "object", which probably says something about what kind of data structures Python developers deal with the most in their lives. Meanwhile, C# and Java seem to be all about strings -- Are people just casting everything to string because they don't want to deal with strict types? -- and PHP is the only language where more people feel like they need to ask about arrays than they do about strings. Which is not surprising since PHP uses arrays for basically everything.
by kijin 2019-04-20 14:58:07 | link | parent | submission

>To me, it feels that there is a very thick wall in between high level languages and something with raw data access like C, C++, and D. That is why we need something that offer 80% the Speed of C, 80% of Simplicity / expressiveness of Javascript / Ruby, and 80% of ease of long term maintenance of a functional PL like Ocaml.
by ksec 2019-04-20 14:38:31 | link | parent | submission

10. bitcoin

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Or, ahem, registers Bitcoin.com, or sets up and controls the r/bitcoin subreddit
by ChainOfFools 2019-10-19 12:37:30 | link | parent | submission

You made an interesting point. This strategy is compatible with all the products I cited (Bitcoin, Facebook, Instagram..etc), i.e they all start with a domain name. However, it would be difficult to guess their name with keywords.
by gomangogo 2019-10-19 12:30:39 | link | parent | submission

Isn't most popular open-source projects also fall into that category? And what happens if someone files a trademark on bitcoin?
by leowoo91 2019-10-19 10:55:13 | link | parent | submission

Oh wow. Did you just compare Bitcoin to the internet itself? Cameras too?! Please, get out of the crypto bubble.
by cameronbrown 2019-10-19 10:42:37 | link | parent | submission