1. docker

Last 5 email alerts sent for docker on Hacker News

Anyone notice how poor design/interface creates jobs? Once you learn the poor design, then you become one of them. Lawyers, accountants, mechanics, engineers, linux engineers, most professions are scams. Once you learn it, you're better off making money in the profession than actually simplifying it and letting the public know the profession is a sham. It's a racket, except no one can be blamed because someone else made the terrible rules/system. "Popular" technologies (on Indeed.com, resume driven development) are not popular because they are good, they are popular because they are bad. If you want to make money, beware of making things too simple... using awful technologies (Kubernetes, Jenkins, Docker, AWS, Chef, Salesforce, Splunk, etc.) is a good business model.
by abcdefg123456 2019-08-24 04:38:02 | link | parent | submission

From their docs “Reaction is built with JavaScript (ES6), Meteor, Node.js and works nicely with Docker.” Is Meteor still being actively developed?
by victor106 2019-08-24 00:19:46 | link | parent | submission

> my impression is security is a huge kludge Docker itself could be called a huge kluge, at least compared to Solaris 'zones' and FreeBSD 'jails'. They're similar to containers, but are supported directly by the kernel, whereas Docker has to pull together different kernel features to create its abstraction. [0] > What's to stop some state agency inserting its code into the core? No way to review everything 1. This isn't a point about containers, it's a point about Free and Open Source software in general. Do you avoid all Open Source software when security matters? 2. I'm pretty sure the Linux kernel folks review everything, and I imagine the Docker folks do too 3. You're implicitly assuming that closed-source software is safe from government pressure. It is not. [0] https://blog.jessfraz.com/post/containers-zones-jails-vms/
by MaxBarraclough 2019-08-23 21:23:45 | link | parent | submission

Look at how the cloud providers offer support for containers. Do they ever offer to run your container in the same VM as those of other customers? They never do this. For secure isolation, they only trust VM isolation. It seems unlikely that this will change. > What would even be the point of user namespacing, network namespaces, filesystem namespaces, etc... if not security? They're for installation/configuration/administration. They allow you to run multiple applications on one Linux VM, and to configure them independently, almost as if you were running multiple VMs (with the advantage of lower overheads - only one instance of the kernel). Kubernetes puts this to good use, letting you treat application deployments as commodities across your cluster. Containers do not offer secure isolation. They are by nature much leakier than the isolation VMs can offer. The Docker folks still treat isolation-failures as bugs, of course. (Well, ignoring things like the way 'uptime' gives the uptime of the underlying machine, and not of your container.)
by MaxBarraclough 2019-08-23 21:08:58 | link | parent | submission

This meme needs to die. Kubernetes is not overkill for non-Google workloads. In my current work, we run several Kubernetes clusters via GKE on Google Cloud Platform. We're a tiny company — less than 20 nodes running web apps, microservices and search engines — but we're benefiting hugely from the operational simplicity of Kubernetes. Much, much, much better than the old fleet of Puppet-managed VMs we used to run. Having surveyed the competition (Docker Swarm, Mesos/Marathon, Rancher, Nomad, LXD, etc.), I'm also confident that Kubernetes was the right choice. Kubernetes may be a large and complex project, but the problem it solves is also complex. Its higher-level cluster primitives are vastly better adapted to modern operations than the "simple" Unix model of daemons and SSH and what not. The attraction isn't just the encapsulation that comes with containers, but the platform that virtualizes physical nodes and allows containers to be treated as ephemeral workloads, along with supporting primitives like persistent volumes, services, ingresses and secrets, and declarative rules like horizontal autoscalers and disruption budgets. Given this platform, you have a "serverless"-like magically scaling machine full of tools at your fingertips. You don't need a huge workload to benefit from that. As for LXD and the other alternatives, these might be great, but Kubernetes has vastly more mainstream adoption these days. That's more important than mere technological superiority, or everyone would be using OpenSolaris with Zones and ZFS these days.
by atombender 2019-08-23 18:55:13 | link | parent | submission

2. Kubernetes

Last 5 email alerts sent for Kubernetes on Hacker News

Anyone notice how poor design/interface creates jobs? Once you learn the poor design, then you become one of them. Lawyers, accountants, mechanics, engineers, linux engineers, most professions are scams. Once you learn it, you're better off making money in the profession than actually simplifying it and letting the public know the profession is a sham. It's a racket, except no one can be blamed because someone else made the terrible rules/system. "Popular" technologies (on Indeed.com, resume driven development) are not popular because they are good, they are popular because they are bad. If you want to make money, beware of making things too simple... using awful technologies (Kubernetes, Jenkins, Docker, AWS, Chef, Salesforce, Splunk, etc.) is a good business model.
by abcdefg123456 2019-08-24 04:38:02 | link | parent | submission

Same. At several companies I've been at we've used or investigated Datadog. One place accidentally spun up a bunch of EMR nodes on AWS for a single run (less than 1 hour), to which we got charged their going rate ($15/mo?) for every instance - even though they were only up for an hour. DD refused to reverse this, though eventually did help up make sure those nodes got excluded going forward ... gee thanks. $15/hr/node for monitoring is too rich for my blood. Most recently it was looked at to help monitor a small Kubernetes test cluster. 3 nodes. Now the base rate of $18/mo is just fine... except now they charge $1/mo/container past 10 containers per host. Because K8s (depending on how you install it) runs a bunch of little containers handling various back end things, you might not deploy anything to the cluster and still be WAY over that 10 container limit. In our case it came out to like $200/mo to monitor 3 nodes - that were no where near fully loaded. They've got a great product but their billing just has not ever really made sense. While I haven't used them, Wavefront makes a lot more sense - pay per metric. Got a bunch of containers that don't need monitoring, then don't send metrics (or send them infrequently). Easy.
by ShakataGaNai 2019-08-23 23:25:09 | link | parent | submission

Look at how the cloud providers offer support for containers. Do they ever offer to run your container in the same VM as those of other customers? They never do this. For secure isolation, they only trust VM isolation. It seems unlikely that this will change. > What would even be the point of user namespacing, network namespaces, filesystem namespaces, etc... if not security? They're for installation/configuration/administration. They allow you to run multiple applications on one Linux VM, and to configure them independently, almost as if you were running multiple VMs (with the advantage of lower overheads - only one instance of the kernel). Kubernetes puts this to good use, letting you treat application deployments as commodities across your cluster. Containers do not offer secure isolation. They are by nature much leakier than the isolation VMs can offer. The Docker folks still treat isolation-failures as bugs, of course. (Well, ignoring things like the way 'uptime' gives the uptime of the underlying machine, and not of your container.)
by MaxBarraclough 2019-08-23 21:08:58 | link | parent | submission

This meme needs to die. Kubernetes is not overkill for non-Google workloads. In my current work, we run several Kubernetes clusters via GKE on Google Cloud Platform. We're a tiny company — less than 20 nodes running web apps, microservices and search engines — but we're benefiting hugely from the operational simplicity of Kubernetes. Much, much, much better than the old fleet of Puppet-managed VMs we used to run. Having surveyed the competition (Docker Swarm, Mesos/Marathon, Rancher, Nomad, LXD, etc.), I'm also confident that Kubernetes was the right choice. Kubernetes may be a large and complex project, but the problem it solves is also complex. Its higher-level cluster primitives are vastly better adapted to modern operations than the "simple" Unix model of daemons and SSH and what not. The attraction isn't just the encapsulation that comes with containers, but the platform that virtualizes physical nodes and allows containers to be treated as ephemeral workloads, along with supporting primitives like persistent volumes, services, ingresses and secrets, and declarative rules like horizontal autoscalers and disruption budgets. Given this platform, you have a "serverless"-like magically scaling machine full of tools at your fingertips. You don't need a huge workload to benefit from that. As for LXD and the other alternatives, these might be great, but Kubernetes has vastly more mainstream adoption these days. That's more important than mere technological superiority, or everyone would be using OpenSolaris with Zones and ZFS these days.
by atombender 2019-08-23 18:55:13 | link | parent | submission

For small setups, it is better to stay away from Kubernetes until it reaches a good level of stability. We jumped early on in the K8S bandwagon (before AWS EKS) and paid a steep price for that. We continue to pay. Our AWS cost has doubled since the time we transitioned to K8S from AWS Elastic Beanstalk. I really wish I could say what would be a good time to embrace K8S, but your mileage might vary. When we made the switch, our service was at about 80TPS during regular load and would go up to 300TPS during peak load.
by ramanathanrv 2019-08-23 18:32:28 | link | parent | submission

3. aws

Last 5 email alerts sent for aws on Hacker News

Anyone notice how poor design/interface creates jobs? Once you learn the poor design, then you become one of them. Lawyers, accountants, mechanics, engineers, linux engineers, most professions are scams. Once you learn it, you're better off making money in the profession than actually simplifying it and letting the public know the profession is a sham. It's a racket, except no one can be blamed because someone else made the terrible rules/system. "Popular" technologies (on Indeed.com, resume driven development) are not popular because they are good, they are popular because they are bad. If you want to make money, beware of making things too simple... using awful technologies (Kubernetes, Jenkins, Docker, AWS, Chef, Salesforce, Splunk, etc.) is a good business model.
by abcdefg123456 2019-08-24 04:38:02 | link | parent | submission

Their billing is HORRIBLE. Its actually a big reason why we are investigating moving off. Its insanely unclear. I get that their product domain is complex, and thus its hard to bill for, but... its things like, if you're container-focused, you still pay for nodes, and you get X number of containers per node that you're allowed to track. You wire up an AWS integration and it (1) counts as a node? I've heard different things from different salespeople about this, and (2) drives up your AWS bill like crazy because of the amount of data it pulls. The datadog-agent inside our kube clusters was constantly one of our largest logging services, until we started filtering those out. We had one of our services go crazy on logs one month, driving up our bill by 1500% until someone caught it (we're small. we make mistakes. we're learning). You can't delete the logs, they wouldn't, so we had to eat a 5 figure bill when we're used to, like $1000/month. And its expensive . Maybe its comparable to something like New Relic, I don't know, but relative to StackDriver or CloudWatch? Its in a totally different league. Just on logging, its hard to do apples-to-apples because DD bills on lines whereas CloudWatch bills on bytes, but for our logging patterns, even with our annual enterprise discount on DD (and no discounts on AWS) DataDog is about 5x more expensive. CloudWatch (even with the new Insights product) is pretty hard to ask front-line developers to use, but StackDriver is pretty nice, and its also pretty cheap. We joke about Datadog among our ops team. When we were investigating adopting them, I signed up for an account with my company email. Within a week, members of their sales teams were emailing our frontend developers , who I imagine they found by linking my company email to a LinkedIn company, about setting up a call. I'd get about one unprompted call a week from someone from their sales org. Their product is great. Possibly even special, though I don't believe its miles better than StackDriver. The company is a nightmare. I tell everyone I can to stay away, at least until they sort out their sales and technical support organizations, if they ever do.
by 013a 2019-08-24 04:20:11 | link | parent | submission

You completely missed where I said outlawing aggregated storefronts, Netflix making their own content and being a distributor is against vertical integration laws, it's just not being enforced. Because that law doesn’t exist. If it did do you think that every media company could blatantly break that law and the government do nothing? Microsoft selling their own product isn't an issue. Microsoft also sells third party products that integrate with their offerings.... Your AWS example falls flat on it's face the product you're still buying is hosting, not an Elastic license. That is also incorrect. AWS offers its own ElasticSearch hosted service where it can only offer the open source subset, but RlasticCo also sells the full license through the AWS marketplace where they host the commercial version on AWS. https://aws.amazon.com/marketplace/seller-profile?id=d8f5903...
by scarface74 2019-08-24 03:05:14 | link | parent | submission

All VPN's are basically illegal there, so its luck of the draw. All of the big providers get blocked pretty fast and I've heard stories about China blocking swaths of AWS too... Apparently the best bet is to get a US SIM with data roaming to China...
by bifrost 2019-08-23 23:47:55 | link | parent | submission

Same. At several companies I've been at we've used or investigated Datadog. One place accidentally spun up a bunch of EMR nodes on AWS for a single run (less than 1 hour), to which we got charged their going rate ($15/mo?) for every instance - even though they were only up for an hour. DD refused to reverse this, though eventually did help up make sure those nodes got excluded going forward ... gee thanks. $15/hr/node for monitoring is too rich for my blood. Most recently it was looked at to help monitor a small Kubernetes test cluster. 3 nodes. Now the base rate of $18/mo is just fine... except now they charge $1/mo/container past 10 containers per host. Because K8s (depending on how you install it) runs a bunch of little containers handling various back end things, you might not deploy anything to the cluster and still be WAY over that 10 container limit. In our case it came out to like $200/mo to monitor 3 nodes - that were no where near fully loaded. They've got a great product but their billing just has not ever really made sense. While I haven't used them, Wavefront makes a lot more sense - pay per metric. Got a bunch of containers that don't need monitoring, then don't send metrics (or send them infrequently). Easy.
by ShakataGaNai 2019-08-23 23:25:09 | link | parent | submission

4. coreos

Last 5 email alerts sent for coreos on Hacker News

"dex" is also the file extension for Dalvik VM bytecode files, and "Pokedex" is for keeping lists of Pokemon, and "Roladex" is yet another product for keeping lists of people, but nobody is getting confused with CoreOS's thing.
by dymk 2019-08-14 22:08:24 | link | parent | submission

https://github.com/dexidp/dex is an existing project which was part of CoreOS's commercial kubernetes offering.
by SEJeff 2019-08-14 22:02:27 | link | parent | submission

Ask HN: Who’s Running OpenShift Cloud Platform 4.x?

My current employer is looking to upgrade to OCP 4 by the end of the year for our hybrid cluster. For those that have already jumped on the upgrade, what are your thoughts so far and are you utilizing the CoreOS platform? My team members who had the opportunity to attend Red Hat Summit 2019 are really excited about this upgrade (read: cluster migration) and how it can make our admin-ing lives significantly easier.
by mroche 2019-08-11 19:00:20 | comments

Don't forget Red Hat bought CoreOS, which was a huge k8s contributor (and the original authors of etcd).
by seabrookmx 2019-08-10 21:52:26 | link | parent | submission

Precisely why Red Hat are moving to CoreOS for openshift.
by petemc_ 2019-08-10 16:32:31 | link | parent | submission

5. javascript

Last 5 email alerts sent for javascript on Hacker News

I haven't seen bot spam go past trivial things. A text field name="url" that's hidden via css gets filled by them. They don't execute JavaScript. Granted, those solutions won't work forever, once they are widely adapted, bots will adapt too, and they obviously won't stop targeted spam.
by luckylion 2019-08-24 05:38:41 | link | parent | submission

I use uBlock Origin and disable JavaScript by default, then instead of enabling those things when sites break, I choose to be more discerning about the websites I visit instead.
by Sir_Cmpwn 2019-08-24 05:04:02 | link | parent | submission

> To me OOP is about using "templates" to create "objects", which map nicely to real world entities/concepts. That's a really commonly held view, and I think it goes off the rails in several fundamental ways: 1. The templates as a separate language feature are unnecessary, a vestigial inheritance from previous languages. One of the things I really like about JavaScript is that it took Self's object system, so I don't need to have a class to get an object. Sometimes it's useful to have a function to generate a family of similar objects. Sometimes it's not. 2. Objects (values in the language) mapping to real world entities/concepts is a dead end. This was actually realized by the database community by 1970, with the relational model. In a relational database, you define relations which may be aspects of an entity, but except in simple cases the entity exists only as a smeared out set of aspects across tables. And further, there need not be an entity that all those aspects describe, or there may be a complex web of entities and different sets of aspects may pick out contradictory, overlapping members of that set. I have found the terminology of phenomenology (suggested reading: Sokolowski, 'Introduction to Phenomenology') as a really good vocabulary for thinking about this. 3. The original motivation for OOP was very different. Consider that you're exploring an idea for a new programming paradigm, approach to AI, something that expresses itself in a mathematical formalism. One of the bottlenecks of CS and AI research was implementing these formalisms as programming languages. OOP came from the observation that you can express these formalisms in terms of message passing actors, and message passing actors are a straightforward thing to implement. So if you have a programming system that's built on message passing actors and you want to try a new formalism, you can add a new arrangement of message passing actors to the same, live system to implement your formalism, which is a lot faster than writing a whole new compiler or interpreter.
by madhadron 2019-08-24 03:25:58 | link | parent | submission

Bash and ZSH is just awful. I can't count the number of times I should have abandoned a script, and start over with a scripting language like ruby, instead of expanding it into a large shell script. But it's also like Javascript where it's everywhere. So it's very useful in some ways. MacOS is removing Ruby and some other languages from being default-installed, but I don't think running rvm/brew installs is too much to ask (usually myself :p).
by dmix 2019-08-24 02:16:02 | link | parent | submission

There’s no reason to use JavaScript for responsive designs. Devs that do it are lazy and sites that do it I’m happy to click away from.
by erikpukinskis 2019-08-24 02:13:28 | link | parent | submission

6. machine learning

Last 5 email alerts sent for machine learning on Hacker News

Show HN: Machine Learning Algorithms (blog.datasciencedojo.com)
by npiccini 2019-08-23 22:57:30 | comments

To me OOP is about using "templates" to create "objects", which map nicely to real world entities/concepts. So a class is like a function, but unlike a function it can do more than define an input to output mapping. It groups together multiple functions and variables, and allows "objects" to exist and be interacted with. These "templates" can be hierarchical and/or have more than one "base template", combining all features. This type of thinking feels natural to model real world objects and tasks. The above is my "layman's" understanding of OOP (I've never taken programming classes, but I have been using OOP extensively in the code I write to do my machine learning research). Now, can someone describe FP in a similar manner to someone like me? Because every couple of years I stumble upon another FP intro, and it just does not click for me. When exactly should I use it?
by p1esk 2019-08-23 22:38:58 | link | parent | submission

If you're optimizing for pure employability and a low entry barrier then Java, but don't expect projects to be too interesting or well paid unless it's FinTech. Likewise with C#. JavaScript + React is a pretty sure bet with plenty of options if you're interested in frontend development. However, if you're optimizing for money and are wiling to invest time (at least one year) in learning then it's: - Swift + iOS. - Scala/Go + Backend development: distributed or real time systems. - Python + Machine Learning.
by macando 2019-08-23 21:10:32 | link | parent | submission

For better or worse, this helps establish neural networks that are not (or less?) vulnerable to deception via e.g. fake eyeglasses [ LINK: https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2978392 ] and adversarial stickers [ LINK: https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09665 ]." From the post: "We’ve developed a method to assess whether a neural network classifier can reliably defend against adversarial attacks not seen during training [such as Elastic, Fog, Gabor, and Snow]. Our method yields a new metric, UAR (Unforeseen Attack Robustness), which evaluates the robustness of a single model against an unanticipated attack, and highlights the need to measure performance across a more diverse range of unforeseen attacks." Paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/1908.08016 Code: https://github.com/ddkang/advex-uar If anyone w/relevant expertise is willing to share thoughts on this: please do.
by mrkoot 2019-08-23 19:48:48 | link | parent | submission

7. python

Last 5 email alerts sent for python on Hacker News

>is that there are 2 types of people: Those who program and those who don't. Is that fully accurate, though? Where does that leave data scientists / data analysts? I know SQL very well, and I know python's data stack (numpy, pandas, matplotlib, plotly, seaborn, various stats toolkits). I have a strong understanding of the "programming ecosystem", I understand computer architecture, I've used and am familiar with (basic) shell/terminal, and services like Docker/Heroku. I can read and understand code and how systems fit together. But I'm not a software engineer. I don't tell people I "program" because my strongest skill is SQL and generally people do not refer to that as "programming".
by oarabbus_ 2019-06-10 18:13:37 | link | parent | submission

Ok, cannot have been Restic then; thanks, I am going to try that one now. And find out what the other Python one was; I was following an SO recommendation.
by tluyben2 2019-06-10 18:07:51 | link | parent | submission

The model isn't that a business user would use Python or R. Rather, a data scientist shares live-computed analytics to business users through a report / dashboard.
by nonfamous 2019-06-10 18:02:42 | link | parent | submission

> I think the development of Python and Jupyter and other less known things like Vega are much more interesting. In that case you may be interested in Dash (dash.plot.ly). It’s a free and open source library that you can use to create dashboards online with Python only.
by qwert-e 2019-06-10 17:16:52 | link | parent | submission

I believe that the python interpreter creates a MemoryError at startup, and throws that when you run out of memory.
by lalaithion 2019-06-10 17:12:24 | link | parent | submission

8. bitcoin

Last 5 email alerts sent for bitcoin on Hacker News

Across the world ads waste a great deal of energy. They are pollution, like mining bitcoin.
by wasdfff 2019-08-23 20:59:59 | link | parent | submission

Miniscript (bitcoin.sipa.be)
by ca98am79 2019-08-23 20:05:34 | comments

I've heared this too, but as far as I know it's only because there are potential bugs in the container software that allow the malware to escape. To me, this is kind of like saying you should just run stuff as root, because there might be a privelege escalation vulnerability which lets the code run as root anyway. Correct me if I'm wrong. My goal was to make things more secure, not completely secure. Previously, dodgy libs could read (and add) ssh keys into ~/.ssh/, take over my NPM account by fetching ~/.npmrc, grab a copy of my ~/.bitcoin/wallet.dat, and add a keylogger into my ~/.bashrc Now, at least it has to break out of docker first.
by mike-cardwell 2019-08-23 15:59:49 | link | parent | submission

9. ios

Last 5 email alerts sent for ios on Hacker News

Usability? Signal prevents backups on iOS and has no solution for someone changing a device (or even restoring a device from a backup) to carry over the conversations and retain chat history and group memberships. This is because it puts security above usability. It’s also buggy in many other ways (e.g., sending safety number change messages when nothing has changed with the device or number; contacts sending messages and asking if it was received, etc.). Signal is quite bad on usability compared to other apps.
by newscracker 2019-08-24 06:26:44 | link | parent | submission

This is really a terrible and sad news. Apple should not treat such a pure and good independent developer at all, and does not give any representations and explanations. I don't know if it is an Apple misunderstanding. But Apple should give developers at least one opportunity to request and communicate. These developers have been supporting your iOS platform for so long and should not be treated as rudely. It is a disaster for the weak independent individuals and our dreams.
by drakeet 2019-08-24 04:44:44 | link | parent | submission

The recaptcha has broken some of the iOS apps for me.
by jvagner 2019-08-24 04:40:01 | link | parent | submission

Unbelievable. As a developer, if I can't feel safe to develop App for iOS/macOS, why should I do it? Apple should explain why they did such a terrible decision.
by cheeriofly 2019-08-24 04:35:38 | link | parent | submission

I posted this somewhere else before, so I will just repost as the answer did not change that much. I use Safari with JS and cross-tracking disabled on macOS and iOS, Firefox with a custom user.js on elementaryOS. I enable JS only when necessary — looking at you, Help Scout. For actual blocking, I run a Pi-hole on a VPS that connects to multiple DNSCrypt servers that I control, which block everything I want while improving privacy. Planning on replacing Pi-hole with AdGuard Home for DNS over HTTPS and DNS over TLS, since I want to have this server public at some point, for others to use. If anyone is interested in testing, shoot me an email at root@jamespond.co. No logging, DNSSEC, disk encryption, Canonical Livepatch, 24/7 monitoring and completely open source. :)
by jamesponddotco 2019-08-24 00:40:19 | link | parent | submission

10. ruby

Last 5 email alerts sent for ruby on Hacker News

Well, I think a book to motivate you and get you out there, making something the quickest, is RE:WORK. It was written by the Ruby on Rails creator and his co founder at Basecamp. It’s pretty different than most books and most ideas are 1-2 pages long and I found that it got me motivated to build faster than any other book.
by elamje 2019-04-20 17:05:49 | link | parent | submission

> everything compiles to the same assembler code so lets not pretend these languages are doing magical things. They don‘t and many of the dynamic features of Python (and Ruby) cannot be efficiently compiled. That‘s why it relies heavily on C modules.
by quonn 2019-04-20 16:01:12 | link | parent | submission

>It's also why you don't get multi-line lambdas. Everything is a compromise. Arguably too much of a compromise. This is just Guido doing a "because I say so" and imposing his bias against functional programming. Give me a properly-designed language like Ruby any day over Python's bag of compromises.
by cutler 2019-04-20 15:30:56 | link | parent | submission

Some of the simple words and their prominence can be amusingly informative, though. Take data structures for example. "string", "array", and "object" are about as equally prominent in both JavaScript and Ruby (where the dictionary is called "hash"). In Python, however, "string" and "list" far outweigh "dictionary" and "object", which probably says something about what kind of data structures Python developers deal with the most in their lives. Meanwhile, C# and Java seem to be all about strings -- Are people just casting everything to string because they don't want to deal with strict types? -- and PHP is the only language where more people feel like they need to ask about arrays than they do about strings. Which is not surprising since PHP uses arrays for basically everything.
by kijin 2019-04-20 14:58:07 | link | parent | submission

>To me, it feels that there is a very thick wall in between high level languages and something with raw data access like C, C++, and D. That is why we need something that offer 80% the Speed of C, 80% of Simplicity / expressiveness of Javascript / Ruby, and 80% of ease of long term maintenance of a functional PL like Ocaml.
by ksec 2019-04-20 14:38:31 | link | parent | submission